The Dirt on Truffles

The Dirt on Truffles
November 13, 2013 Aaliyah9504

When you see a truffle, you can’t help but wonder what the big deal about it is. It’s often described as knobby looking potato and yet, it is this visually unappealing truffle that is considered the diamond of the culinary world. What is it about this clump of dirt that has people scrambling over themselves to get their hands on it? Considering the fact that even the smallest amounts of it, cost a small fortune, here are a couple of things you might want to know about truffles before you give into it’s mesmerizing aroma.

A truffle is a fungus.

A truffle is a fungus, plain and simple. It usually grows under Oak, Birch, Pine, Hazel trees. They are usually found underground and need to be ‘hunted’. Truffles are widely grown in forested areas of Europe, North Africa, Middle East and North America.

Types of Truffles

There are two main types of truffles, Black Truffles and White Truffles. White truffles are slightly more sought after and expensive than the black truffles, because they are a little rarer to find that the black ones.
Truffle season is usually from November through March. Black Summer truffles can also be found in July.

Cutlivation | Harvest | Truffle Hunting.

Have you ever heard of the phrase, an expensive mistake. There could not be a better example than in the case of truffle harvesting. Collecting them requires experience and training. Hunters prefer to use dogs or hogs to help sniff out the truffle without damaging it. The only real danger here is of the hogs eating the truffles! Some of the more inexperienced truffle hunters tend to use rakes, where they rake out the truffles from their hidden spots, but in this case sometimes the immature truffles are also raked out, reducing the quality.

Truffle hunting has become quite the tourist attraction these days. Like in the small town of San Giovanni d’Asso, southest of Siena in Tuscany, where people come from all over the world just to go truffle hunting!

Cooking with Truffles.

Be sure to use the truffles on the same day and no later than the third day after you get them (should you be so lucky as to get your hands on them), lest they lose their wonderful earthy flavour.

Truffles can be used in several forms, like truffle salt, truffle oil, truffle Vodka, however, there is nothing to compare to using it in all its fungus glory. One should never try to cook white truffles, because it causes the truffles to lose their flavour under heat and are much better off as shavings. With Black truffles however, you can afford to cook it (bare minimum cooking, mind you).

Truffle Festivals.

Would you believe that people travel all over the world just to see and buy something that often resembles a clump of dirt? Believe it. Here are some of the festivals,in the Tuscany area which celebrate this culinary royalty.

San Giovanni d’Asso: This Tuscan Truffle Festival takes place during the second and third weeks of November. A cluster of stalls selling white truffles as well as food stalls and restaurants selling food infused with truffles. As simple as it may sound, it is definitely an experience of a life time.

San Miniato Truffle Festival: San Miniato is a small town in the province of Pisa, in the Tuscany region in the lower Arno Valley. 25% of Italy’s truffle production happens in this area and it only makes sense that there is a special festival to celebrate all things truffle. A group tents with a beautiful duomo serving as the backdrop, this festival is a dream come true for all food lovers. From full truffle to olive oil infused with truffles. Restaurants pop up purely to make some amazing food to showcase truffles. It’s a truffle dream come true. This festival happens in the second, third and fourth weekends of November.

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